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  #1  
Old April 14th, 2012, 04:55 PM
Leyysasa
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Default GNDU Syllabus MA

I am a student of Guru Nanak Dev University MA and I am searching for the syllabus so please can you give me the syllabus and tell me from where can I download the syllabus PDF free of cost?
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  #2  
Old April 30th, 2012, 05:28 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

The GNDU offers M.A.(Hons.) in the following subjects.

English, Religious Studies, Philosophy, , Hindi, History, (Vocal) Music, (Instrumental) Music, Political Science, Psychology, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sociology

Which subject’s syllabus you want please give me name of the subject so that I can provide you the syllabus.
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  #3  
Old July 10th, 2012, 10:53 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

dear sir i want to apperar in m.a philosophy part1 as a private student plz guide me ifthe syllabus of the said class is avialable
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  #4  
Old July 23rd, 2012, 08:40 PM
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Post Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
dear sir i want to apperar in m.a philosophy part1 as a private student plz guide me ifthe syllabus of the said class is avialable
dear sir i want to appear in ma philosophy part1 as aprivate candidate plz guide me if the syllabus is available
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  #5  
Old July 24th, 2012, 04:21 PM
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sir.i am doing m.a.in punjabi.please tell me syllabus of 1st smester of 2nd year.
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  #6  
Old August 21st, 2012, 12:49 PM
JAWINDER
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Smile Re: GNDU Syllabus MA POLITICAL SCIIENCE SAMESTAR SYSTEM

PROVIDE THE POLITICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS
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  #7  
Old September 5th, 2012, 08:34 PM
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Quote:
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sir.i am doing m.a.in punjabi.please tell me syllabus of 1st smester of 2nd year.
I WANT TO ET THE SYLLABUS OF MA 1ST AND ND SEM
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  #8  
Old September 11th, 2012, 01:34 PM
shiv diyal
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

sir i am doing M A POLITICAL SCIENCE plz tell me syllabus of this subject
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  #9  
Old September 11th, 2012, 08:13 PM
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ritically examine the affect of disintigration of USSRor third world contries
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  #10  
Old September 12th, 2012, 11:18 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Dear Sir. I am student of M.A. English.. I have completed my 1st year annually.. and now i have to do my 2nd year. Kindly please tell me the syllabus for 2nd year annual examination.
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  #11  
Old September 14th, 2012, 12:39 PM
Rajwinder sandhu
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

i'm doing M.A. in Punjabi. please tell me syllabus of 1st smester.
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  #12  
Old September 15th, 2012, 08:50 PM
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sir i want to give the paper of improvement of m.a. history .i have done m.a. history from guru nanak dev university in 2009.in which annual /smester system can i give the papers?sir i hav also got the degree.i want to give the paper of m.a. part one.i have done my m.a. part one in 2005-2006.plz give me response as soon as possible.
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  #13  
Old September 18th, 2012, 01:36 PM
NISHU SHARMA
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

I am a student of Guru Nanak Dev University MA (2ND YEAR) and I am searching for the syllabus so please can you give me the syllabus and tell me from where can I download the syllabus PDF free of cost?
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  #14  
Old October 2nd, 2012, 05:10 PM
priyankamehta
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

sir i want to do ma english from gndu amritsar as private candidate.. kindly tell me the syllabus and last date of submission of addmision form..tell me the syllabus ma part1 and part2 also...
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  #15  
Old October 25th, 2012, 10:13 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

sir plz send me m.a 1st police administration syllabus........
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  #16  
Old November 15th, 2012, 02:17 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

[QUOTE=Sashwat;58724]The GNDU offers M.A.(Hons.) in the following subjects.

English, Religious Studies, Philosophy, , Hindi, History, (Vocal) Music, (Instrumental) Music, Political Science, Psychology, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sociology

Which subject’s syllabus you want please give me name of the subject so that I can provide you the syllabus.
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  #17  
Old November 15th, 2012, 02:20 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

[QUOTE=Unregistered;100498]I WANT TO ET THE SYLLABUS OF MA 1ST AND ND SEM
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  #18  
Old November 19th, 2012, 07:05 PM
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i am doing MA sanskrit plz send me syllabus
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  #19  
Old November 23rd, 2012, 05:55 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

please provide me syllabus of MA politicla science part II (annual )
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  #20  
Old December 10th, 2012, 04:41 PM
DAMANPREET KAUR
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Respected Sir,
I m doing M.A 2nd year punjabi from GNDU and i want to syllabus of this class, so plz can u send me syllabus...
thanx
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  #21  
Old December 10th, 2012, 04:46 PM
DAMANPREET KAUR
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA 2ND year Punjabi (annual)

please provide me syllabus of M.A punjabi 2nd year.
thanx
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  #22  
Old January 21st, 2013, 04:04 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

I am a student of Guru Nanak Dev University MA 2nd yr (in punjabi) and I am searching for the syllabus so please can you send me the syllabus on my id rubiaangle@yahoo.com
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  #23  
Old January 24th, 2013, 06:13 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sashwat View Post
The GNDU offers M.A.(Hons.) in the following subjects.

English, Religious Studies, Philosophy, , Hindi, History, (Vocal) Music, (Instrumental) Music, Political Science, Psychology, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sociology

Which subject’s syllabus you want please give me name of the subject so that I can provide you the syllabus.

Sir I want syllabus of m.a. hindi 2nd yr of annual system plz send me syllabus on gill.rajdeep1234@gmail.com
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  #24  
Old March 19th, 2013, 12:59 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

sir please i want ma punjabi 2nd yer sllyabass
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  #25  
Old March 20th, 2013, 01:28 PM
mandeep kaur deol
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dear sir i am student of MA.please provide da syllabus of MA. 2nd semester. thanks.
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  #26  
Old June 13th, 2013, 12:21 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

i want syllabus of m.a. english 3rd sem
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  #27  
Old June 20th, 2013, 04:15 PM
kamaljit kaur
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

my subjects were in b.a : compulsory punjabi compulsory english history political science and sociology . please guide me i can do m.a in english or punjabi or not.
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  #28  
Old July 9th, 2013, 01:02 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Plz send me syllabus ma punjabi Ist year
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  #29  
Old July 10th, 2013, 12:02 AM
ramen91_preet@yahoo.com
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA(eco)1

sir i want to do ma eco AS A PRIVATE Student.please provide me syyllabus and book detail prescribed by gndu.i am very much thanking you.
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  #30  
Old July 22nd, 2013, 06:15 PM
navpreet singh1
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sashwat View Post
The GNDU offers M.A.(Hons.) in the following subjects.

English, Religious Studies, Philosophy, , Hindi, History, (Vocal) Music, (Instrumental) Music, Political Science, Psychology, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sociology

Which subject’s syllabus you want please give me name of the subject so that I can provide you the syllabus.
hello my elf navpreet i wanna know the syllabus of ma history..?
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  #31  
Old August 6th, 2013, 02:38 PM
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[QUOTE=Leyysasa;55439]I am a student of Guru Nanak Dev University MA and I am searching for the syllabus so please can you give me the syllabus and tell me from where can I download the syllabus
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  #32  
Old August 8th, 2013, 12:47 PM
Vikramjit Singh khunda
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Post Re: GNDU Syllabus MA Punjabi 3 sem

Dear sir
Please Find this message I doing to study M.A ElE Punjabi 3rd Sem I am find the Syallabus 3 SEmester Plz Send me this mail ID vvlovepreet444@gmail.com
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  #33  
Old August 8th, 2013, 12:51 PM
chingambura
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

good afternoon sir i am jatin sharma from beas ,i am private candidate of ma.english. i want sllybus please send meeee, on jatindersharma41@yahoo.com, my num is 9041862201.... plzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
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  #34  
Old August 12th, 2013, 01:38 PM
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I AM SIMRAN DHILLON IAM STUDENT GURU NANAK DEV UNIVERSITY FROM MA ENGHLISH SEMESTER 1ST IAM TELLING FOR SALLYBUS ENGLISH SEMESTER 1ST
PLEASE REGARDING ME
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  #35  
Old September 20th, 2013, 03:31 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Sir plz send me MA religious sllyabus
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  #36  
Old December 2nd, 2013, 08:06 PM
RANJEET KAUR
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

I am a student of Guru Nanak Dev University MA and I am searching for the syllabus so please can you give me the syllabus and tell me from where can I download the syllabus PDF free of cost?[/QUOTE]
PLACE ME MA PUNJABI SYALLBUS
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  #37  
Old February 1st, 2014, 01:42 PM
kamalthind
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

dear sir ,
i want to syllabus ma pol sci 4th semester plz send me syllabus
plz regard me
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  #38  
Old February 16th, 2014, 02:03 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

The M.A. Education Syllabus is as follows:

PHILOSOPHICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF
EDUCATION-I:

M.A. EDUCATION SEMESTER–I

PAPER- I
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The students will be able to
• Understand and explain the nature and functions of educational philosophy.
• Comprehend the impact of Indian Schools of Philosophy on the educational
processes.
• Elaborate the relationship of education and social change.
• Understand and explain the intimate relationship between education and sociology.

Note: Examiner will set 9 questions in all, selecting two each from four units; one (9th) question
will spread over entire syllabus. The 9th question will be compulsory and will consist of four
short answer type questions.
Student has to attempt five questions, selecting one from each unit. 9th question will be
compulsory. All questions carry equal marks.

COURSE CONTENT
Unit I
a) Philosophy of Education – Its Nature and Functions [Speculative, Normative, Critical and
Analytical]

b) Branches of Educational Philosophy – Metaphysics, Epistemology, Axiology and Logic.
Relationship with education.

c) Epistemology (Science of Knowledge)-Sources and methods of acquiring the following types
of Knowledge: Authoritative, Empirical, Scientific, Rational and Intuitive.

Unit II
a) Educational visions of Aurobindo, Tagore, Gandhi and J. Krishnamurti
b) Brief discussion of Indian Schools of Philosophy: Buddhism and Jainism.

Unit III
a) Concept of Educational Sociology and Sociology of Education.
b) Scope and Functions of Sociology of Education.
c) Relationship of Sociology and Education.

Unit IV
a) Determinants of social change with respect to India
b) Constraints on social change in India: Caste, Class, Religion, Language, Regionalism and
Ethnicity.

BOOKS RECOMMENDED:
1. Banerjee, A.C. & Sharma, S.R. (1999): Sociological and Philosophical issues in Education.
Jaipur: Book Enclave.
2. Brubacher, John S. (ed) (1962): Modern Philosophy of Education. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall
Inc., Englewood Cliffs.
3. Hiriyanna, M. (1995): The Essentials of Indian Philosophy. Delhi: Motilal Banarasidas
Publishers.
4. Kneller, G.F. (1963): Foundations of Education. London and New York: John Wiley and
Sons, Inc.
5. Pandey, R.S. (1997): East West Thoughts on Education. Allahabad: Horizon Publishers.
6. Park, J. (1961): The Philosophy of Education. New York: Macmillan Company.
7. Phenix, P.H. (1960): Philosophy of Education. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
8. Sharma, A.P. (1997) : An Approach to Philosophy of Education. Delhi: Indian Publications.
9. Sodhi, T.S. & Suri, A. (2003) : Philosophical and Sociological Foundation of Education.
Patiala: Bawa Publications.
10. Weber, C.O. (1960) Basic Philosophies of Education. New York: Holt, Rinehart and
Winston.
11. Weerasinghe S.G.M. (1993): The Sankhya Philosophy: A Critical Evaluation of its origins
and Development. Delhi: Sri Satguru Publications - A Division of Indian Books Centre.

M.A. EDUCATION SEMESTER–I
PAPER-2

COURSE OBJECTIVES
The students will be able to:
• Explain the nature, scope and methods of educational psychology.
• Describe the process of growth and development.
• Explain the concept of learning.

Note: Examiner will set 9 questions in all, selecting two each from four units, one (9th) question
will spread over entire syllabus. The 9th question will be compulsory and will consist of four
short answer type questions.
Student has to attempt five questions, selecting one from each unit. 9th question will be
compulsory. All questions carry equal marks.

COURSE CONTENT
A) THEORY
Unit I
a) Nature, Scope and Aims of Educational Psychology. Relationship between Education and
Psychology.
b) Methods of Educational Psychology-Observation, Experimental, Developmental:
Longitudinal and Cross sectional.
c) Recent Trends in Educational Psychology.

Unit II
a) Growth and Development: Concept, Differences, Principles of development; factors
affecting human development.
b) Physical, Cognitive, Social and Emotional development during adolescence.

Unit III
a) Individual differences: Concept and its Determinant. Role of heredity and environment.
b) Learning: Concept and factors affecting learning, Gagne’s Hierarchy of learning.
c) Learning and Motivation, Transfer of learning: Concept and Implications for education.

M.A. EDUCATION SEMESTER–I
Unit IV
a) Learning Theories: SR theories by Pavlov, Thorndike, Skinner, and Hull’s Reinforcement
Theory.
b) Cognitive Theories: Learning by Insight by Kohler, Tolman’s Theory.

B) PRACTICAL (Terminal) MARKS: 20
Conduct & Interpretation of following experiments:
a) Learning Curve
b) Effect of knowledge of results on learning.
c) Whole Vs Part method of learning.
d) Transfer of Learning (with mirror drawing apparatus).

BOOKS RECOMMENDED:
1. Bigge, M.L. & Hunt, M.P. (1968): Psychological Foundations of Education (2nd Edition).
N.Y.: Harper & Row.
2. Bienter, R.F. Mifflin. (1978): Psychology Applied to Teaching. Boston: Haughton.
3. Bigge, M.C. & Row. (1971): Learning Theories for Teachers (2nd Edition). N.Y.: Harper
Collins.
4. Chauhan, S.S. (1978): Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing
House.
5. Dececco, J.P. (1968): The Psychology of Learning and Instruction. New Delhi: Prentice Hall
of India.
6. Gagne, P.M. (1965): Conditions of Learning. N.Y.: Prentice Hall.
7. Good, T.L. & Brodhy, J.E. (1977): Educational Psychology and Realistic Approach. N.Y.:
Holt.
8. Hilgard, E.R. & Bower, S.H. (1975): Theories of Learning. Cliffs: Prentice Hall.
9. Mathur, S.S. (1986): Educational Psychology, Revised and Enlarged Text Edition. Agra:
Vinod Pustak Mandir.
10. Vargas, J.S. (1977): Behaviour Psychology for Teachers. New York: Harper Row.
11. Baron, R.A. (2007): Psychology, India: Porling Kindersley & Pearson Education.
12. Danion, W. (1983): Social and Personality Development Infancy Through Adolescence, New
York: Norton.
13. Singh, Dalip (2000): Emotional Intelligence at Work, New Delhi: Sage.
14. Dash. M. (1994): Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications.

15. Engler Barbara (1991): Personality Theories: An Introduction, 3rd Ed. Boston: Houghton
Mifflin Company.
16. Good, Thomas, L. & Brodhy, Jore E., (1977): Educational Psychology and Realistic
Approach, N.Y. Holt.
17. Gagne Peter, M. (1965): Conditions of Learning, N.Y. Hall.
18. Hurlock, EB (2004): Developmental Psychology: A Life span Approach (5th Ed. New Delhi)
Tata McGraw- Hill Publishing Co. Ltd.
19. Kundu, C.L. & Tutoo., D.N. (1989): Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers
Pvt. Ltd.
20. Mangal, S.K. (2006) : Advanced Education Psychology, New Delhi:: Prentice Hall of India
21. Mazur, J.E. (1994): Learning and Behaviour. (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs. New Jersey;
Prentice Hall
22. Lazrus Richard, S. (1963): Personality and Adjustment, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.
23. Vergas J.S. (1977): Behaviour Psychology for Teachers. New York: Harper Row.
24. Wnag. M.C. & Walber, H.J. (eds) (1985): Adopting instruction to Individual Differences.
Berkeley Cl. Mg. Catchan.
25. Woolfolk, Anita, E. (1987) : Educational Psychology (3rd Ed.) Englewood Cliffs. Printice
Hall.
26. Hall,C.S. & Lindsey(1976) : Theories of Personality, John Wiley and Sons.
27. Zohar Danah & Marshal Ian (2001) : Spiritual Intelligence: the ultimate intelligence, New
York; Bloomsbury Publishing.

PAPER-3

COURSE OBJECTIVES
The students will be able to:
• Explain the meaning, nature and types of educational research.
• Formulate research problem.
• Explain the meaning of statistics and measures of central tendency and
variability.

Note
i. Examiner will set 9 questions in all, selecting two each from four units, one (9th) question will
spread over entire syllabus. The 9th question will be compulsory and will consist of four short
answer type questions.
Student has to attempt five questions, selecting one from each unit. 9th question will be
compulsory. All questions carry equal marks.
ii. Use of all brands of non-programmable calculators having signs of ‘+’, ‘-‘, ‘x’, ‘_’, π only is
allowed in the examination centre, but these will NOT be provided by the University.

COURSE CONTENT
Unit I
(a) Research in Education: Meaning, nature and characteristics of research as a scientific
method.
(b) Significance of research in Education.
(c) - Fundamentals, applied and action research.
- Qualitative and quantitative research
- Priority areas in educational research.

Unit II
(a) Formulation of Research Problem:
- Criteria and sources for identifying the problem,
- Delineating and operationalising the variables.
- Review of previous research
(b) Hypothesis: Definition, types, importance, and criteria of a good hypothesis.

Unit III
a) Statistics: Meaning and importance, descriptive and inferential statistics.
b) Organization and tabulation of data, frequency distributions.

c) Graphical Representation of Data: Histogram. Frequency Polygon, Ogive, Pie diagram,
Simple and Multiple Bar diagram.

Unit IV
a) Meaning, uses, limitations, computation and relative selection of the following measures
of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, Mode.
b) Meaning, uses, limitations, computation and relative selection of the following measures
of Variability: Range, Quartile deviation, Average deviation, Standard deviation.

BOOKS RECOMMENDED:
1. Aggarwal, Y.P. (1989): Statistical Methods. New Delhi: Sterling.
2. Best, J.W. (1981): Research in Education. New Delhi: Prentice Hall.
3. Dalen, Van D.B. (1962): Understanding Educational Research. New York: McGraw Hill.
4. Ferguson, G.E. (1981): Statistical Analysis in Psychology and Education. New York:
McGraw Hill.
5. Garret, H.E. (1978): Statistics - In Education and Psychology. Bombay: Vakils, Feffer
and Simons.
6. Gay, L.R. (1992): Educational Research Competencies for Analysis and Applications.
Macmillan.
7. Good, C.V. (1966): Essentials of Educational Research: Methodology and Design. New
York: Appleton-Century Crafts.
8. Guilford, J.P. (1989) : Fundamental Statistics - In Psychology and Education (6th
Edition). New York: McGraw Hill.
9. Kamber, D. (2000): Action learning and Action Research. London: Kogan Page Ltd.
10. Kaul, L. (2000): Methodology of Educational Research, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing
House Pvt. Ltd.
11. Siegel, S. & Castellan, N.J. (1988): Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioural
Sciences. McGraw Hill.
12. Whitney, F.L. (1962): Elements of Research. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.

II. OPTIONAL PAPERS

COURSE OBJECTIVES
The students will be able to:
• Explain the concepts and techniques of measurement and evaluation.
• Develop skills in the construction and standardization of tests.
• Explain the applications of advanced statistical techniques.

Note
i. Examiner will set 9 questions in all, selecting two each from four units; one (9th) question
will spread over entire syllabus. The 9th question will be compulsory and will consist of four
short answer type questions. Student has to attempt five questions, selecting one from each
unit. 9th question will be compulsory. All questions carry equal marks.
ii. Use of all brands of non-programmable calculators having signs of ‘+’, ‘-’, ‘x’, ‘ח’
only is allowed in the examination centre, but these will not be provided by the
University/College.

COURSE CONTENT
Unit I
Measurement and Evaluation- Meaning, importance and functions. Levels of measurement.
Types of Achievement Tests- Essay and Objective.

Unit II
Norm-referenced and Criterion referenced Tests, Standardized and Teacher made test;
Construction and standardization of Achievement test.

Unit III
Meaning of statistical inferences and reliability of statistics (Mean only).

Unit IV
Significance of difference between means, t ratio and CR.

BOOKS RECOMMENDED:
1. Anastasi, A. (1988): Psychological Testing (6th Ed.). New York: The Macmillan Co.
2. Ebel, L.R. and Fristris, D.A. (1991): Essentials of Educational Measurement. New Delhi:
Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.
3. Edwards, A.L. (1957): Techniques of Attitudes Scale Construction. New York.
4. Freeman, F.S. (1965): Theory and Practice of Psychological Testing. New York: Rinehart
and Winston.
5. Gakhar, S.C. (2009): Statistics - In Education and Psychology
6. Garret, H.E. (1973): Statistics - In Education and Psychology. Bombay: Vakils, Feffer
and Simons.
7. Guilford, S.P. and Fruchter, B. (1973): Fundamental Statistics - In Psychology and
Education (5th Edition). New York: McGraw Hill and Co.
8. Thorndike, R.L. and Hagen, E. (1977): Measurement and Evaluation - In Psychology and
Education. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

PAPER-4 & 5

COURSE OBJECTIVES
The students will be able to:
Explain concept, principles, aims, need and development of guidance.
Describe nature of guidance programs at various levels i.e. primary, 10th and 10+2 stage
and various types of guidance services.
Elaborate counseling process and counselor’s role and function.
Describe various types and approaches of counseling.

Note: Examiner will set 9 questions in all, selecting two each from four units; one (9th) question
will spread over entire syllabus. The 9th question will be compulsory and will consist of four
short answer type questions.
Student has to attempt five questions, selecting one from each unit. 9th question will be
compulsory. All questions carry equal marks.

COURSE CONTENT
A) THEORY
Unit I
a) Guidance: concept and principles, aims and need, scope of guidance, development of
guidance.
b) Guidance Programme for: i) Primary class students ii) Tenth class students iii) 10+2 class
students.

Unit II
Guidance Services: a) Information b) Assessment c) Vocational d) Placement e)
Follow-up

Unit III
a) Counselling : Meaning, nature and purpose of counselling, Origin and development of
counselling
b) Counsellor and counselee
i) Counselor: characteristics, role and functions.
ii) Counselee: development characteristics of counselee, common counselee concerns
and common problems.

Unit IV
a) Types of counseling: crisis, facilitative, preventive and developmental.
b) Approaches of counseling: directive, non directive and eclectic.

B) PRACTICAL (Sessional) MARKS: 20
Visit to employment exchange and guidance and counseling cell/bureau.

BOOKS RECOMMENDED:
1. Ghose, J. (1995): Vocational Guidance. New Delhi: USS Publications.
2. Jones, A.J. (1970): Principles of Guidance. New York: McGraw Hill Book Company.
3. Mohan, S. (1999): Career Development - In India (Ed.). Delhi: Vikas Publishing
House, Pvt. Ltd.
4. Myers, G.E. (1941): Principles and Techniques of Vocational Guidance. New York: McGraw
Hill.
5. Shertzer, B. & Stone, S.C. (1981): Fundamentals of Guidance. U.S.A.: Houghton,
Mifflin Co.
6. Taxler, A.E. (1964): Techniques of Guidance. New York: McGraw Hill.
7. Tolbert, E.L. (1978): An Introduction to Guidance. Toronto: Little Brown and Company.
8. Arbucle, D.S. (1965): Counselling : Philosophy, Theory and Practice, Boston, Allyn and
Bacon.
9. Bantole, M.D. (1984): Guidance and Counselling, Bombay, Sheth and Sheth Publications.
10. Blocher, D.H. (1987) :The Professional Counsellor, N.Y. Macmillan.
11. Dryden, Windy and Filethaman Colin (1994): Developing Counsellor Training, London,
Sage.
12. D.G.E. and T.Pumphlets/Publications, Ministry of Labour, Govt. of India (from time to
time).
13. Gelso, C.J. and Fretz, B.R. (1995): Counselling Psychology Prisin Book, Banglore.
14. George, R.l. and Critiani T.S. (1990): Counselling Theory and Practice, New Jercy, Prentice
Hall.
15. Jayanti Ghose (1995) :Vocational Guidance, New Delhi, U.S.S. Publication.
16. Leuis, M.D., Mayer, R.L. and Louis, J.A. (1986) : An Introduction to Counselling,
Profession, illinas, F.E. Peacock Publishers.
17. Lister N.Downing Guidance and Counselling Service : An introduction.
18. Myers, G.E. (1948) :Principles and Techniques of Vocational Guidance. Mecgraw Hills
Company, London.
19. Pietrofa, J.J.Hoffman, A and Splete, H.H.(1984) :Counselling: An Introduction, E.
Houghton, Mifflin Company.
20. Petterson, G.H.(1962) :Counselling and Guidance in Schools, Mecgraw Hill Book Company,
London.
21. Shertzer, B. and Stone S.C.(1974) :Fundamentals of Counselling, Boston, Houghton Mifflin
Co.
22. Sherlzer, B., and Stone S.G. (1980): Fundamentals of Guidance. Boston, Houghton Mifflin
Co.
23. Tolbert, E.L.(1978) :An Introduction to Guidance, Little Brown and Company. Toronto.
PAPER-4 & 5
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The students will be able to:
• Explain the concept, historical development, need, scope and types of educational
technology.
• Describe the concept of Psycho-Technology - in relation to nature of learning, theories of
learning and conditions of learning.
• Explain the concept of information and communication technology and systems
technology.
• Explain the concepts of management technology and planning technology.
Note
Examiner will set 9 questions in all, selecting two each from four units, one (9th) question
will spread over entire syllabus. The 9th question will be compulsory and will consist of four
short answer type questions.
Student has to attempt five questions, selecting one from each unit. 9th question will
be compulsory.
All questions carry equal marks.

COURSE CONTENT
Unit I
Concept of educational technology, historical development, need, scope and types of educational
technology.

Unit II
Psycho technology, nature of learning, theories of learning, S-R theories (Pavlov’s, Thorndike’s,
Skinner’s, Hull’s) and cognitive field theories (Kurt Lewin’s), conditions of learning (Gagne’s).

Unit III
Information and communication technology concept, characteristics and modes of one to one,
one to group, group to group communication, network communications, use of ICT in teachinglearning.

Unit IV
Management technology: Management of Classroom Instructions.
Planning Technology: Inputs (diversified curriculum, teacher input infrastructure for teaching
learning process).
System Technology: System approach.

Books Recommended:
1. Ahuja, M. (2000): Implementing Mastery Learning Strategies: Tasks of a Teacher,
University News, Vol.38, No. 22, May 29, 2000.
2. Ahuja, M. (2007): Mastery Learning: A Practical Approach. Meerut: Vivek Publishers.
3. Anderson, L.W. (1996): Individualized Instruction. In Plomp. T., Jeerd & Ely, Donald P.
(Eds.). International Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. U.K.: Cambridge.
4. Bhushan, A. & Ahuja, M. (2003): Educational Technology; Theory & Practice (2nd Edition).
Patiala: Bawa Publications.
5. Bigge, M.L. (1967): Learning Theories for Teachers. Delhi: Universal Book Stall.
6. Block, J.N. (1971): Mastery Learning: Theory & Practice. New York: Holt Rinehart &
Winston, Inc.
7. Bloom, (1956): Ed. Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Handbook X Cognitive Domain.
New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
8. Clark, C.M. (1987): The Carroll Model-in M.J. Dunkin (Ed.). The International
Encyclopaedia of Teaching & Teacher Education, Oxford: Pergamon Press.
9. Das, R.C. (1993): Educational Technology: A Basic Text. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers
Private Limited.
10. Erikson, B. (1969): A Systems Approach to Education, Educational Technology, Vol. IX.
No.6.
11. Hill, W.F. (1967): Learning. London: Methuen & Co. Ltd.
12. Joyce & Weils (1985): Models of Teaching. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.
13. Mehra, V. (2004): Educational Technology. New Delhi: SSP.
14. Mohanty, (1992).: Educational Technology. New Delhi: Deep and Deep Publications.
15. Russell, M. (1993): Instructional Media (4th Ed.). Canada: Macmillan Publishing Company.

PAPER-4 & 5

COURSE OBJECTIVES
The students will be able to:
Explain nature and causes of exceptionality.
Suggest the alternative or remedial educational provisions for special children.
Understand concept of mental retardation and provisions for them.
Understand the process of practical assessment of special children.

Note
Examiner will set 9 questions in all, selecting two each from four units, one (9th) question will
spread over entire syllabus. The 9th question will be compulsory and will consist of four short
answer type questions.
Student has to attempt five questions, selecting one from each unit. 9th question will be
compulsory. All questions carry equal marks.

COURSE CONTENT:
A) THEORY
Unit I
Special education:
a) Concept, meaning and need.
b) Historical Perspective and Relevance of Special Education.
c) Children with special needs: Concept, Classification according to various criteria:
Intelligence, Sense organs, Locomotion, Speech and other aspects.

Unit II
Learning disability:
a) Concept and Meaning, Types, Characteristics
b) Identification and Remedial Measures

Unit III
Gifted and Creative:
a) Concept, Difference, Characteristics, Identification.
b) Educational provisions for the Gifted, nurturing Creativity.

Unit IV
Mental Retardation:
a) Definition, Characteristics, Causes and Identification
b) Classification, Education, Vocational provisions.

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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Guru Nanak Dev University was established at Amritsar, India in 1969.It is affiliated to the UGC.

For the MA English Syllabus of Guru Nanak Dev University

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
Scheme of Study:
Semester – I:
Paper-I: Poetry (Upto Romantic Age)
Paper-II: Drama (Elizabethan)
Paper-III: English Novel (Upto 19th Century)
Paper-IV: Phonetics and Spoken English
Paper-V: Short Stories and Prose
Semester – II:
Paper-VI: Poetry (Victorian & Modern)
Paper-VII: Modern Drama
Paper-VIII: Modern Novel
Paper-IX: English Grammar and Writing
Paper-X: Irish Literature
Semester – III:
Paper-IX: History and Literary Movements
Paper-X: General Linguistics
Paper-XI: Literary Criticism
Paper-XII: Indian Writing in English
Semester – IV:
Paper-XIII: Modern Literary Theory
Paper-XIV: American Literature
Paper-XV: Post Colonial Literature

Any one from following:
Paper-XVI (i): Indian Writing in Translation
Paper-XVI (ii): World Classics in Translation
Paper-XVI (iii): Greek Literature

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-I
Paper-I: Poetry (Upto Romantic Age)
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).

Unit – I
John Milton: Paradise Lost, Book – 1
Unit – II
John Donne:
- The Good Morrow
- The Sunne Rising
- The Extasie
- A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning
- The Canonization
- Batter My Heart
- Three Personed God
- A Hymn to God The Father
- The Flea
Unit – III
William Wordsworth:
- Lines Composed a Few Miles
- Ode : Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood
- Three years She grew
- Sonnet: London, 1802
Unit – IV
John Keats:
- Ode to Psyche
- Ode to a Nightingale
- Ode on Grecian Urn
- To Autumn

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-I
Paper-II: Drama (Elizabethan)
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).

Unit – I
Aristotle: Poetics (Butcher’s Translation)
Unit – II
Christopher Marlowe: Doctor Faustus
Unit – III
William Shakespeare: Hamlet
Unit – IV
William Shakespeare: As You Like It

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-I
Paper-III: English Novel (Upto 19th Century)
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).

Unit –I
Jane Austen: Pride And Prejudice
Unit –II
Thomas Hardy: Jude The Obscure
Unit – III
Emily Bronte: Wuthering Hights
Unit – IV
Charles Dickens: Hard Times

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-I
Paper-IV: Phonetics and Spoken English
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. As for as possible, the questions should be direct and pointed.
Questions may relate both to theory and English speech in practice. The narrower the
question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices in each
question should preferably deal with practical aspects of spoken English. Theoretical
questions must also ask for illustrative answers. If required, the examiner may also have
sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these questions in not more than 800
words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).

Unit–I
Varieties of English
Organs of Speech
The R.P.English, IPA alphabet
General Indian English
Unit–II
The Sounds of English
Articulation, description and classification of English phonemes
Allophonic Variants in R.P.English
Morphophonemic changes
Indian variants of English phonemes
Unit–III
The Syllable and its structure
Stress and stress change in English words
Stress rules
Unit–IV
Features of Connected English Speech
Weak form,
Intonation patterns of English
Functions of Intonation

Recommended Text:
1. Roach, Peter, English Phonetics and Phonology, Cambridge: CUP, 2000.
Reference Books:
1. Jones, Gimson and Ramsaran, English Pronouncing Dictionary, 14th ed. UBS.
2. Sethi, J. and Dhamija P.V.A Course in Phonetics and Spoken English, ND: Prentice Hall
of India, 1990.
3. Sethi J and Jindal, D.V. A Handbook of Pronunciation of English Words, ND: Prentice Hall
of India, 1993.
4. Bansal, R.K. and Harrison, J.B.Spoken English for India, ND: Orient Longman, 1972.

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-I
Paper-V: Short Stories and Prose
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).

Unit-I
Francis Bacon: "Of Marriage and Single Life"
"Of Studies"
"Of Nature In Men"
"Of Revenge"
"Of Envy"
"Of Riches"
"Of Gardens"
"Of Simulation and Dissimulation"
Unit-II
Charles Lamb: "Dream Children: A Reverie"
"A Dissertation upon Roast Pig"
"New Year's Eve"
"All Fools' Day"
"Imperfect Sympathies"
"Christ's Hospital Five-and-Thirty Years Ago"
Unit-III
Bertrand Russell: "The Superior Virtue of the Oppressed"
"On Being Modern-minded"
"The Functions of a Teacher"
"Ideas that have Helped Mankind"
"Ideas that have Harmed Mankind"
Unit-IV
Henry James: "The Turn of the Screw"
"Aspern Papers"

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-II
Paper-VI: Poetry (Victorian & Modern)
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.

Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).

Unit – I
Robert Browning:
- Porphyria’s Lover
- The Last Ride Together
- One Word More
- The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxed’s Church
Unit – II
W.B. Yeats:
- When you are old and grey
- The Second Coming
- A Prayer for my Daughter
- Leda and the Swan
- Sailing to Byzantium
- Among School Children
- Easter 1916

Unit – III
T.S. Eliot:
- The Waste Land
- Gerontion
Unit – IV
Phillip Larkin
- Church Going
- The Whitsun Weddings
- Toads
- Dockery and Son
- The Building
- High Windows

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-II
Paper-VII: Modern Drama
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.

Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).

Unit – I
Bernard Shaw: Saint Joan
Unit – II
T.S. Eliot: The Family Reunion
Unit – III
Samuel Beckett: Waiting for Godot
Unit – IV
Harold Pinter: The Birthday Party

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-II
Paper-VIII: Modern Novel
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).

Unit – I
D.H. Lawrence: Sons and Lovers
Unit – II
Virginia Woolf: Mrs. Dalloway
Unit – III
Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness
Unit – IV
William Golding: Lord of the Flies

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-II
Paper-IX: English Grammar and Writing
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.

Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. As for as possible, the questions should be direct and pointed.
Questions may relate both to theory and English speech in practice. The narrower the
question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. If required, the examiner may also
have sub-parts of a question. For Unit IV, the students will be required to write an essay
on any one of the four given topics of literary and social interest (not requiring special
or technical knowledge). Students must demonstrate the use of development techniques
and pruduce a coherent and complete write up. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).
Unit-I
Words and Morphemes
Morphemes and affixes
Free and bound morphemes
Word formation processes in English

Unit-II
Parts of speech
Form and Function
Verb and Verb phrase; Verbal forms, regular and irregular verbs
Auxiliaries: Tense and aspects
Noun and Noun Phrase
Determiners and sequence of determiners, Reference
Adjective: Attributive and predicative; Comparison and intensification
Adverb and adverbials, Place relation, time relation
Adjunct, Disjunct and Conjunct
Preposition and prepositional phrase
The Simple sentence: basic sentence patterns; concord

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
Unit-III
Co-ordination; conjunctions
The complex sentence; subordination
Finite and non-finite clauses
Relative clauses; Apposition; restrictive and non-restrictive clauses, Adverbial
clauses and its types
Complement clauses and the complex noun phrases
Cohesion in text; Sentence / clause connectors, ellipsis, substitution, discourse
Reference

Unit-IV:
Applied Grammar and Composition
Basic Sentence Faults (Section 6-14)
Effective Sentences (Section 33-36)
The Whole Composition (Section 31)
Effective Paragraphs (Section 32)

Recommended Text:
Quirk, R. and Greenbaum, S. A. University Grammar of English, Longman, 1973.
Huddleston, Rodney, English Grammar: An Outline, CUP, 1996
Singh, Sukhdev and Singh Balbir, Grammar of the Modern English Language, Foundation
Books, CUP, 2012.
McCrimmon, J.M., Writing with a Purpose, NY: Houghton Mifflin, 1957
Halliday, M.A.K. and Hasan, R., Cohesion in English, Longman, 1976
Legget, Glen et. al. Essentials of Grammar and Composition, Prentice Hall of India, 1988

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-II
Paper-X: Irish Literature
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 80
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 24 and 56 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected parts etc. The narrower the question,
the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words each. Each
question will carry 4 marks (4x6=24)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 14 marks. (14x4=56).
Unit-I
Oscar Wilde: The Importance of Being Ernest
Unit-II
J.M. Synge: The Playboy of the Western World
Unit-III
Jonathan Swift: Gulliver's Travels
Unit-IV
James Joyce: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-III
Paper-IX: History and Literary Movements
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively:-
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit – I
- Classical Literature and Its Influence
- Medieval Literature
- Religion and The Renaissance
- Enlightenment, Neoclassicism, and Romanticism
Unit – II
- Nineteen Century
- Modernism
- Post-Modernism
- Folklore, Culture, and Popular Culture
Unit – III
- Neoclassical Drama
- Modern Drama
- Poetry upto 1900
- Modern Poetry
Unit – IV
- Rise of the Novel upto 1900
- Modern Fiction
- The Short Story
- Postcolonial and Diasporic Literature

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-III
Paper-X: General Linguistics
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. As for as possible, the questions should be direct and pointed.
Questions may relate both to theory and Language in use. The narrower the question,
the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words each. Each
question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. At least a couple of choice
questions in this section must require students to do linguistic analysis of language.
Theoretical questions may also ask for illustrative answers. If required, the examiner
may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these questions in not
more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit–I
Structural Theory:
Saussure: The nature of Linguistic sign, Signifier and Signified; Syntagmatic and
paradigmatic Relations; Synchrony and Diachrony; Langue and Parole etc. Bloomfield:
Scientific Study of Language; Corpus based analysis; Discovery Procedures: minimal
pairs, pattern congruity, complementary distribution, IC analysis.

Unit–II
Transformational Generative Theory:
Chomsky: Competence and Performance, Syntactic Structures, Phrase Structure rules,
Basic transformational rules e.g. negative, question, passive, Deep Structure and Surface
Structure.
Unit–III
Functional Theory:
Halliday: Functions of Language Ideational, Interpersonal Textual Field, Tesor and
Mode of Discourse Clause as message, exchange and representation.
Unit–IV:
Applied Linguistics:
i. Stylistics: Text and discourse; Cohesion, Deviation,Foregrounding, etc.
ii. Methods and Approaches to Language Teaching: Grammar-Translation, Direct
and Audio-Lingual Methods; Structural and Communicative Approaches.

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-III
Paper-XI: Literary Criticism
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit – I
Wordsworth: Preface to Lyrical Ballads
Unit – II
Mathew Arnold
- The Study of Poetry
- The Functions of Criticism at the Present Time
Unit – III
T.S. Eliot
- Tradition and Individual Talent
- The Frontiers of Criticism
Unit – IV
Northrop Frye: The Archetypes of Literature
Victor Shklovsky: Art as Technique

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-III
Paper-XII: Indian Writing in English
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit – I
Nissim Ezekiel:
Enterprise
Philosophy
Night of the Scorpion
Poet, Lover, Birdwatcher
The Visitor
Background, Casually
Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa, T.S
Kamala Das:
The Freaks
My Grandmother's House
A Hot Noon in Malabar
The Sunshine Cat
The Invitation
The Looking-glass
Unit – II
Raja Rao: Kanthapura
Unit – III
Anita Desai: Fasting Feasting
Unit – IV
Arundhati Roy: The God of Small Things

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-IV
Paper-XIII: Modern Literary Theory
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit–I
Lionel Trilling: Freud and Literature
Toril Moi: Feminist Literary Criticism
Unit–II
Terry Eagleton
- Literature and History
- Form and Content
Unit–III
Edward Said: Crises (In Orientalism)
Unit–IV
Roman Jakobson: Linguistics and Poetics
Roland Barthes: The Death of the Author

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-IV
Paper-XIV: American Literature
Time: 3 Hours ` Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit–I
Walt Whitman
- From Song of Myself Sec. 1, 6, 32, 40
- Crossing Brooklyn Ferry
- Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking
Robert Frost
- Neither Out Far Nor In Deep
- The Onset
- Design
- Mending Wall
- The Road not Taken
- Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening
- The Gift outright

Unit–II
Nathaniel Hawthorne: The Scarlet Letter
Unit–III
Arthur Miller: Death of a Salesman
Unit–IV
Saul Bellow: The Victim

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-IV
Paper-XV: Post Colonial Literature
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit–I
Chinua Achebe: Things Fall Apart
Unit–II
Bapsi Sidhwa: The Ice-Candy Man
Unit–III
Margaret Atwood: Surfacing
Unit–IV
Judith Wright:
The Company of Lovers
Women to man
The Harp and the King
Clock and Heart
The Two Fires
The Beanstalk, Meditated later
Vision
For my daughter
Poem and Audience

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-IV
Paper-XVI (i): Indian Writing in Translation
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit–I
Kalidas: Shakuntala
Unit–II
Guru Nanak: Japuji
Unit–III
Tagore: The Home and The World
Unit–IV
Anandamurthy: Samsakara

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM
SEMESTER-IV
Paper-XVI (ii): World Classics in Translation
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit–I
Fyodor Dostoevsky: Crime and Punishment
Unit–II
Henrik Ibsen: Ghosts
Unit–III
Albert Camus: The Outsider
Unit–IV
Franz Kafka: The Trial

M.A. ENGLISH SEMESTER SYSTEM

SEMESTER-IV
Paper-XVI (iii): Greek Literature
Time: 3 Hours Max. Marks: 100
The question paper shall consist of Parts-A and B having 36 and 64 marks respectively.
Part-A: Eight (8) short questions (two from each unit) will be set. Students will be required to
answer six (6) of them. The short questions are aimed at examining the first hand
reading of prescribed texts. These shall relate to particular themes, actions, characters,
setting, literary / linguistic significance of selected scenes / stanzas etc. The narrower
the question, the better it is. The students shall answer these questions within 150 words
each. Each question will carry 6 marks (6x6=36)

Part-B: Four (4) questions (one from each Unit) will be set. The students will be required to
attempt all. Each question will have internal choice. One of the two choices should
preferably deal with literary and social background of the author / text. If required, the
examiner may also have sub-parts of a question. The students shall answer these
questions in not more than 800 words. Each question will carry 16 marks. (16x4=64).

Each paper is to be given 6 contact hours.
Unit–I
Aeschylus: Agamemnon
Unit–II
Sophocles: Oedipus, The King
Unit–III
Euripides: Medea
Unit–IV
Aristophanes: The Frogs

Contact:
Guru Nanak Dev University
Grand Trunk Rd, Off NH 1, Amritsar, Punjab, 143005, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab 143005 ‎
0183 225 5711

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  #40  
Old July 5th, 2014, 11:08 AM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA history hons entrence exam

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sashwat View Post
The GNDU offers M.A.(Hons.) in the following subjects.

English, Religious Studies, Philosophy, , Hindi, History, (Vocal) Music, (Instrumental) Music, Political Science, Psychology, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sociology

Which subject’s syllabus you want please give me name of the subject so that I can provide you the syllabus.
MA histiry hons entrecne exam sayllabus 2014
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  #41  
Old July 5th, 2014, 11:06 PM
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;85940]sir.i am doing m.a Punjabi in first year plz sir tell me a sylabus of m.a first year
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  #42  
Old July 10th, 2014, 02:34 PM
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I want the ma hindi first semrster syllabus
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  #43  
Old September 5th, 2014, 02:41 PM
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Sir i want syllabus of ma history 3rd semester
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  #44  
Old September 27th, 2014, 05:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
MA histiry hons entrecne exam sayllabus 2014
Sir ,i want syllabus of M.A in sociology
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  #45  
Old October 2nd, 2014, 11:26 AM
Riya hans
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Plz sir provide me syllabus of hindi ma 1st sam
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  #46  
Old October 8th, 2014, 06:07 PM
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Default Re: GNDU Syllabus MA

Plz tell ne M A history syllabus 1st year semester's
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